Electric versus Manual Citrus Juicers

The thick, bitter rinds of citrus fruits makes standard juicers unsuitable. Special-purpose electrical juicers, manual reamers or presses are used instead.

Unlike a normal juicer, the entire fruit isn’t pulped by a citrus juicer. The fruit is cut in half and placed in the juicer. The juice is squeezed out, leaving the bitter skin of the fruit intact and out of the juice.

Popular brands include Waring, Oster, Hamilton Beach and Metrokane.

Manual Citrus Reamers

manual citrus juicer

Traditional manual reamers do work. The reamer faces upwards and the fruit is pressed by hand and rotated against the ribbed cone. Some have swappable large and small cones, suitable for grapefruit, oranges, lemons and limes.

They are best used for small quantities of juice, not for a full glass of orange juice.

Advantages

  • Cheap, simple and reliable.
  • Easy to clean.
  • Can be kept in drawer.
  • Depending on the size of the cone, can be suitable for large fruit such as grapefruit.

Disadvantages

  • Not the best for squeezing out the most juice.
  • Slow and requires hand strength.

Citrus Hand Presses

Citrus Hand Presses

Orange/lemon/lime presses work like oversized garlic presses. While strong hands are required, leverage makes them easier to use compared to manual reamers. This makes them suitable for one or two cups of juice but not much more.

Different sizes are available for different-sized fruit.

Advantages

  • Cheap, simple and reliable.
  • Easy to clean.
  • Small, can be kept in drawer.
  • Can squeeze out a lot of juice.

Disadvantages

  • Need strong hands to use.
  • Most are designed for small or medium sized fruit. Larger fruit has to be cut into quarters.
  • Because of the high pressure, juice can squirt all over the place if care is not taken.

Orange Lever Presses

These are like hand presses but are mounted on a stand, a bit like a vertical drill press. A lever arm (like a jackpot machine) is pulled down to squeeze the fruit.

Advantages

  • Good leverage makes it easy to use, even by those with weak hands.
  • Suitable for gallons of juice.

Disadvantages

  • Takes up counter space.
  • Expensive.
  • Most are designed for small or medium sized fruit. Larger fruit has to be cut into quarters.

Motorized Reamers

Motorized juicers are like manual reamers. The difference is that an electric motor spins the cone. The fruit-halve is held in the hand and pushed down on to the cone. Some are combined with a lever press to mechanically press the fruit against the rotating cone.

Heavy juicers are more stable, better able to resist the torque of the motor.

Some juicers have auto-reversing cones, changing direction to better squeeze out the pulp. Unfortunately the gearing required can be noisy and unreliable. Single-direction and gearless direct-drive motors are more reliable.

Advantages

  • Suitable for gallons of juice.
  • Depending on the size of the cone, can be suitable for large fruit such as grapefruit.

Disadvantages

  • Takes up counter space.
  • Expensive.
  • Motors are often underpowered and unreliable. A 50 to 100 watt motor should be powerful enough. A five year warranty for the motor is rare, but possible to find.

The Best Orange Juicer

The right juicer depends on

  • The size of the fruit (grapefruit, orange, lime).
  • The amount of fruit to be juiced.

Motorized juicers are popular because they can quickly squeeze large amounts of fruit. However motor and gear reliability issues mean that lever press machines should also be considered.

For small amounts of juice, a citrus press is probably better than a manual cone reamer.

Stainless steel is best but plastic juicers can work well.


Exotic Fruit Juice of Ecuador: Passion Fruit, Guanabanas, Blackberries and More!

Ecuador, which features geography from coastal plains and jungles to snow-capped volcanoes, is a wonderful place to grow fruit. Ecuadorian farmers produce much that is familiar to foreigners, such as strawberries, mangos, pineapples, melons and apples, but if you’re ever there, be sure to challenge yourself with these local favorites you’re unlikely to find in the fruit section back home:

Ecuadorian fruits usually made into juice:

Maracuyá (passion fruit) Maracuyá is a small, egg-shaped yellow fruit. It is hollow, and inside you’ll find several dozen seeds, each of which is covered with a gooey, pulpy outer layer. The fruit is edible right off the vine, but it has a very strong, tart flavor. Generally Ecuadorians separate the pulp from the seeds – a couple of seconds in a blender does the trick nicely – and make juice, adding about one tablespoon of sugar per maracuyá.

Mora (Blackberry) Ecuadorian blackberries are different from the ones you’re used to: they are larger, a little more tart and are grown year-round. The blackberry bushes grow like weeds in most parts of the country, and a small space devoted to them can produce buckets of berries. Although they can be eaten right off the vine, generally Ecuadorians blend them with water and add a little sugar for a tasty juice that is very popular.

Tomate de Arbol (Tree Tomato)A tree tomato is a red, egg-shaped fruit full of pulp-covered seeds, a little like a passion fruit. They are called “tree tomatoes” for two reasons: first of all, because their reddish color is a little like that of a tomato, and the juice made from the seeds tastes vaguely of tomato as well. There is no actual relation between these and real tomatoes. Tree tomatoes are good for juice, or for boiling in sugar for a dessert treat: they are too sour to eat fresh.

Taxo (Banana Passionfruit) A Taxo is an elongated, soft fruit that looks a little like a small, straight, orange banana. Inside of the fruit, dozens of seeds are covered in pulp: theses are separated, and the pulp is used to make juice or ice cream. The skin is discarded. Taxos have a tangy, tart taste, and although they can be eaten fresh, they rarely are. Unless you buy them in the market, chances are the only chance you’ll get to try them is if you go to a place that specializes in helados de paila, or handmade ice cream, where taxo is a popular flavor.

Guanábana (Soursop) The Guanábana is a green fruit with a rough outer skin. They can get quite large, some reaching the approximate size of a volleyball. Inside the rough green skin, the fruit is white and pulpy and full of many seeds, each of which is about the size of a cherry. This white flesh can be eaten fresh, and tastes vaguely of strawberry. It is very sweet and mild. Because it is very messy to eat and the seeds are annoying, Ecuadorians prefer to make juice out of them.

Naranjilla (Little Orange) Anaranjilla are round, bright orange fruit a little smaller than a tennis ball. The inside is full of tiny seeds and pulp: it is scooped out and blended, strained and sweetened to make a greenish-orange, tangy juice that has an interesting perfume-y aftertaste. The naranjilla is native to Ecuador and Colombia and rarely grown elsewhere, so be sure to try it when you’re in town.

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